JOIN TSC MEMBERSHIP to #CONNECTCOLLABORATECREATE EVERY DAY – #CONNECTWITHRESOURCES #COLLABORATEONSOLUTIONS #CREATEOPPORTUNITIES

An Etiquette Refresher for Business Owners and Entrepreneurs & Their Online Behavior

Jan 18 2016

by Mandy Edwards

Etiquette Refresher - Southern C

According to a Pew Research study in fall of 2015, 73% of Americans go online on a daily basis and nearly two-thirds of American adults (65%) use social networking sites. Yet, probably more than a third of them act like a child online – business owners and entrepreneurs included.

When you are a business owner or entrepreneur, what you do and say online can have positive and negative ramifications on your business. Yes, you can post freely, however when you are attached to a business or you are your business, the spotlight is on you more.

I haven’t written about etiquette in a while (and it’s a soapbox topics for me as well) I thought now was a great time for all of us to have a simple refresher course (or post) on that topic, but this time geared more towards business owners and entrepreneurs.

So, what do  you (we) need to do?

Do not ignore people.

Much like how you wouldn’t want to be ignored in real life, don’t ignore someone online. If someone takes the time to respond to something you have out there – a tweet, a Facebook post, acknowledge it. People want to feel like they matter and ignoring them tells them they don’t. Same goes for blog comments. Even if it’s a simple thank you, you’ve acknowledged it. Something else to consider – I know we all cannot stand the generic LinkedIn messages, but if someone requests a connection with you and you do not want to accept it, it’s okay to respond and tell them why.

True story: A few years ago, there was a local restaurant here where I live that my husband and I wanted to eat at. I looked them up on Facebook to see their hours (they didn’t have a website – I know!) and saw they were open so we went. When we pulled up, they were closed and there was a different set of hours on their door. Needless to say we weren’t happy. Being the social media person I am, I went online and left a post on their Facebook page’s wall letting them know what happened and asked them to correct the hours on their page. 24 hours later – no response. 3 days later – no response. 4 days later I went back to their page and the post had been deleted. No apology or acknowledgement, it was deleted. Talk about being mad. Up until the day it closed (which was last year), we never set foot in that restaurant. We were potential customers that they lost out on.

Moral of the story: Respond! Had they responded with something, we would have gone back to try them out and become customers.

Do not steal other people’s work.

Seriously. Plagiarism happens every day on the web. I’ve had it happen to 3 of my blog posts. Friends have had theirs stolen multiple times too. Google doesn’t like it and we don’t either. There are proper ways to go about reusing published content. Contact the author and ask about their republication policy (we all have them and they aren’t all the same). It adds value to the relationship when you ask first and it shows appreciation on both sides.

This just does not only apply to blog posts, it goes for social media posts as well. My friend Jenn Herman of Jenn’s Trends had this happen to her earlier this year. Her specialty is Instagram marketing and some guy totally lifted her posts as his own. See below –

jenn

The photo caption said,

>>>>>Calling on all of you for HELP!<<<<<@mattspierce thinks he can steal other people’s content (and mine) and get away with it! Read below and help us report him!

#Repost @theinstagramexpert
???
NEED YOUR URGENT ATTENTION! I am reaching out to my InstaAwesome community…@mattspierce not only took a screen shot of Jenn, our respected friend & my biz partner for @insta.academy but Matt is using her face, her art, her creation to solicit business for his MLM Lead generator biz… (You have to scroll back.. He posted it 12 weeks ago )… So I challenge all of you to help Jenn by leaving a comment on Matts account under Jenn’s picture and to report it. This is the power of an Authentic Community. I am speaking at @smexaminer on stage in March and I will be talking about this in front of thousand of viewers. He deleted & blocked my comment when I logged in as @suebzimmerman BUT remember I have 7 accts. so was able to log in as @suebdo.capecod I am tagging ALL my online Expert pals who can help but I also need YOU all to take action … After all I would help each and everyone of you if something this unethical happens to your account! I am here to help you!!!

True Story: I have a client who is a high-end portrait photographer. She had a fellow peer in her industry have photos she (the peer) took and posted on another photographer’s website. This thief had a family see the pictures and hired them to do their photos. When they showed up, the photographer (the thief) was asking them to help her with her camera and posing – stuff she should have already known had she taken the pictures. The family quickly found out she didn’t take the photos she saw and found out who did and hired the original photographer (my client’s friend).

Moral of the story: When you steal, you will be found out and like pop! goes the weasel, pop! there goes your business.

Act your age.

I really shouldn’t have to actually type this out, but if you’re 35, 55 or even 25, act it. A lot of people try to use social media to make themselves bigger than they are and it comes back to get them (social media professionals included). Acting your age and showing your maturity will earn you respect and authority.

A good tip to keep in mind for yourself and your staff – if it would make your grandma blush, don’t post it.

This applies to content and language. There is absolutely no place for cursing online. Same applies to language that could offend someone (i.e. racial slurs, name-calling). Think of grandma – what would she say? We’re all adults here and we need to act like it (see above). Same applies especially to business owners – there is no place for an owner to respond with that type of language to a post on their business account. Trust me, you’ll end up like Amy’s Bakery in Arizona (read about it here).

Don’t assume.

This applies to just about everything. When you see something online don’t always assume it’s real or legit. There’s a lot of spam out there and do your friends a favor and check it out before sharing it, especially on your business account.

This also applies to tone. In writing it’s so hard to determine the tone of the writer from mere words. For example, I could type “That’s not funny.” and mean it as either a laughing “that’s not funny” making light of something or a harsh “that’s not funny” really getting onto someone. If there is something posted you do not understand, just ask. Ask for clarification. It will save hurt feelings or misunderstandings.

Try to keep things vanilla enough that your readers/fans will understand your tone. If it’s something that may be confusing, make a video and post it!

Spell check! Please!!!

There is nothing more unprofessional than misspellings and incorrect grammar. Proof everything you write BEFORE hitting the post/tweet/publish button.

I know we will all make a type here and there, we’re human, it’s going to happen. It never hurts to have a second set of eyes look over something before it goes online. Not everything has an ‘edit’ button.

Ross Gellar from “Friends” points out a popular one… (sorry, had to!)

anigif_enhanced-buzz-9762-1395323424-18

To be honest, I could write another 3000 words about social media/online etiquette. How you (and you staff) act online says a lot about you – your character, your beliefs, even your business practices.

In a day where the negative spreads MUCH faster than the positive, we all have to be careful with what we do. say and publish online. The internet is world of mouth now. How well does your actions reflect on you as the business owner or entrepreneur? If it’s not what you want, it’s not too late to change. Take some time and look at what you are doing and write out some proactive steps to shape your actions the way you want them.

Now it’s your turn – what are best practices for social media etiquette that YOU would share?

2 COMMENTS

Mandy Edwards View More Blog Posts from this Author

Midwest Transplant. Wife. Mom to 2 redheaded daughters. Owner of ME Marketing Services, a social media marketing company. Proud University of Georgia alum and Bulldog football season ticket holder. Honored as one of UGA's 40 Under 40 Alumni for 2016. British Royal History Fanatic. Love all things Southern.

Leave a Comment

2 responses on “An Etiquette Refresher for Business Owners and Entrepreneurs & Their Online Behavior

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Related Posts